Tag Archives: pizza

Quick bites in Indianapolis: Napolese Pizzeria and IMA Cafe

A few weeks ago I set off on an 1,800 mile road trip to see my favorite musician, Stewart Copeland, perform twice with his new “Off The Score” ensemble. Yes, I just as dedicated to the music I love as I am to good food and cooking! The first stop on my journey would be in Indianapolis, Indiana, where I’d have time to grab one lunch on my own and then dinner with some of my friends who had also taken the trip for the show.

Continue reading

What’s for dinner: Week of January 12

It’s been a pretty cold week here in South Jersey and as such dragging myself out of the house to the supermarket has been low on the priority list. So I’ve been doing a lot of cooking to use up what’s been in the freezer or the fridge and trying to make some favorite comfort food dishes as well.

Continue reading

What’s for dinner: Weekend edition

As I mentioned last week, this past Thursday was the 10th anniversary of my first date with my sweetie. So while we had a nice dinner at Bo Ne that evening, we really wanted to do something special Friday night when we had more time. So a dinner at StudioKitchen in Philadelphia seemed perfect to fit the bill.

Continue reading

Toscana in Mullica Hill now closed…and one mystery post finally solved.

Just recently, I learned that local Italian restaurant Toscana in Mullica Hill has closed its doors. According to the note now posted at their former website, the closing is due to a disagreement with the landlord. Patrons are encouraged to visit A’Pizze in Swedesboro, their sister restaurant where many of the staff will now be found.

Continue reading

Italy 2014 Day 11: Ristorante Pizzeria La Fornacella (Ercolano) and Lombardi a S. Chiara (Naples)

This was to be our last full day in Naples, yet we would be spending it largely elsewhere: visiting the archeological site of Herculaneum. Destroyed in the same 79 AD eruption of Vesuvius that buried Pompeii, Herculaneum is a smaller site that is actually better preserved than its more well-known “sister city”.  Buried under approximately 20 meters of ash, wooden beams and household items are preserved here (even some food as well!), and the frescoes on many walls are more complete and vibrant.  There is even an ancient wooden boat which had been found at the shoreline, along with the skeletal remains of some 300 people who tried to flee but were caught in the unsurvivable blast of hot ash.

Continue reading